Atypical Antipsychotics May Slow Loss of Gray Matter in Schizophrenia

September 28, 2015 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

gray matter loss in schizophrenia

Progressive losses in gray matter have been observed in the cortex of people with schizophrenia, and those at high risk for the illness. In the past, studies have shown that the amount of antipsychotics a patient is exposed to is correlated with the extent of their deficits in gray matter, suggesting that antipsychotic treatment could exacerbate gray matter loss.

A new meta-analysis by Antotonio Vita and colleagues in the journal Biological Psychiatry shows that first-generation antipsychotics were associated with greater losses in gray matter compared with atypical antipsychotics, which seemed to slow the loss of gray matter.

The meta-analysis analyzed data from 18 longitudinal studies comparing a total of 1155 patients with schizophrenia to 911 healthy control participants. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showed that over time, patients with schizophrenia lost more cortical gray matter volume. The patients’ cumulative intake of any kind of antipsychotic between MRI scans was associated with gray matter losses. But when Vita and colleagues drilled down to find differences between patients taking first-generation antipsychotics and those taking second-generation atypical antipsychotics, they found that patients with higher average daily intake of first-generation antipsychotics had greater losses in gray matter, while patients with higher average daily intake of atypical antipsychotics had less progressive losses in gray matter.

This study is the first to compare the effects of first-generation antipsychotics, which were developed in the 1960s, with those of atypical antipsychotics, which came into frequent use in the late 1980s, on cortical gray matter loss in schizophrenia. While first-generation antipsychotics are associated with the side effect of tardive dyskinesia, involuntary movements of the face and jaw, atypical antipsychotics are most commonly associated with weight gain.

Three studies have randomly assigned patients with schizophrenia to receive either first-generation or atypical antipsychotics. In these studies as well, second-generation antipsychotics were associated with smaller losses in gray matter.

The authors speculate that either second-generation antipsychotics may have neuroprotective effects, or first-generation antipsychotics may have neurotoxic effects. They also suggest that first-generation antipsychotics may not have the capacity to interfere with the natural progression of schizophrenia in terms of gray matter losses.

Future studies may investigate differences between specific antipsychotic medications’ effects on gray matter volume. Vita and colleagues reported that in the analysis, the atypical antipsychotic clozapine was associated with the least loss of gray matter of any medication in the included studies.

Editor’s Note: This study is important because it adds to findings questioning the conclusions of a large National Institute of Mental Health–sponsored study known as CATIE and a meta-analysis by John Geddes published in the journal BMJ in 2000, in which he wrote that “There is no clear evidence that atypical antipsychotics are more effective or better tolerated than conventional (first generation) antipsychotics.” Read more

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Prevent Conversion to Psychosis

September 18, 2015 · Posted in Course of Illness, Current Treatments, Risk Factors · Comment 

omega-3 fatty acids for psychosis preventionA new long-term study of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for psychosis prevention shows that almost seven years after a 3-month stint of receiving these dietary supplements daily, adolescents and young adults at high risk for psychosis showed fewer symptoms of conversion to full-blown psychosis than those who received placebo during the same period.

The research team, led by Paul Amminger, originally found that among 81 youth (mean age 16.5) at high risk of developing psychosis due to their family histories, the 41 who received 12 weeks of daily supplementation with 700mg of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) omega-3s and 480 mg of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) omega-3s showed reduced likelihood of conversion to psychosis one year later than the 40 who received placebo.

The team followed up an average of 6.7 years later with 71 of the original 81 participants. Among those who had received the omega-3 intervention, 9.8% had developed psychosis. Among the placebo group, 40% had developed psychosis, and they had done so earlier.

In addition, the omega-3 participants were better functioning, they had required less antipsychotic medication, and they had lower rates of any psychiatric disorder than the placebo group.
Amminger wrote in the journal Nature Communications, “Unlike antipsychotics, fish oil tablets have no side effects and arent’s stigmatizing to patients.”

Editor’s Note: Because of their lack of side effects, a good case can be made for omega-3 fatty acids for patients at high risk for psychosis. The novel thing about this study is that short-term treatment with omega-3 fatty acids had preventive effects almost 7 years later.

RTMS in the Elderly and After ECT

September 8, 2015 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

rTMS in the elderly and after ECT

At the 2015 meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry in May, researcher Daniel Blumberger reported to this editor (Robert M. Post) that he has found repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to be effective for depression in late life. Blumberger noted that it may be necessary to use higher intensity stimulation (i.e. at 120% of motor threshold instead of the usual 110% of motor threshold) in the elderly in order to overcome the gap between the skull and the brain, which can grow with age due to brain atrophy.

Blumberger has also successfully used rTMS as a followup treatment to a successful course of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), administering rTMS twice a week for up to 66 treatments in a given patient in order to maintain remission of their depression.

Bloomberg Covers Ketamine as a Depression Treatment

September 1, 2015 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

Over the years, we’ve tried to keep readers updated about ketamine‘s use as a fast-acting antidepressant. Bloomberg Business recently covered how the drug is being used by some to treat depression.

Most SSRIs Free of Birth Defect Risk Early in Pregnancy, Fluoxetine and Paroxetine are Exceptions

August 26, 2015 · Posted in Current Treatments, Risk Factors · Comment 

antidepressants during pregnancy

A large study of women who took selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants in the month before pregnancy and throughout the first trimester suggests that there is a smaller risk of birth defects associated with SSRI use than previously thought, though some risks were elevated in women who took paroxetine or fluoxetine.

The 2015 study, by Jennita Reefhuis and colleagues in the journal BMJ, investigated the drugs citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline, and examined birth defects that had previously been associated with SSRI use in smaller studies. The participants were 17,952 mothers of infants with birth defects and 9,857 mothers of infants without birth defects who had delivered between 1997 and 2009.

Sertraline was the most commonly used SSRI among the women in the study. None of the birth defects included in the study were associated with sertraline use early in pregnancy. The study found that some birth defects were 2 to 3.5 times more likely to occur in women who had taken fluoxetine or paroxetine early in their pregnancies.

Five different birth defects, while uncommon, were statistically linked to paroxetine use: anencephaly (undersized brain), heart problems including atrial septal defects and right ventricular outflow tract obstruction defects, and defects in the abdominal wall including gastroschisis and omphalocele. Two types of birth defects were associated with fluoxetine use: right ventricular outflow tract obstruction defects and craniosynostosis (premature fusion of the skull bones). Absolute incidence of these defects was also low.

RTMS and Other Treatments for Depression in Pregnancy

August 24, 2015 · Posted in Current Treatments, Potential Treatments · Comment 

depression during pregnancy

At the May meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, researcher Deborah Kim gave a talk on the use of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for depression in women who are pregnant. In rTMS treatment, an electromagnetic coil is placed against the side of the forehead and magnetic pulses that can penetrate the scalp are converted into small electrical currents that stimulate neurons in the brain. Kim had recently completed an open study of rTMS in pregnant women, in which 70% of the women responded to rTMS. In another controlled randomized study of 30 women (also by Kim), 75% responded to active rTMS and 50% responded to a sham procedure. None of the women included had problems with the fetus or during delivery.

RTMS offers an alternative to women who are reluctant to take antidepressants during pregnancy. Kim cited data by Lee S. Cohen and colleagues in which women taking antidepressants show a 68% relapse rate if they stop taking these medications during pregnancy compared to a 26% relapse rate among those who continue taking antidepressants during pregnancy. Concerns about antidepressants’ potential effects on a fetus may have been overemphasized. Kim summarized the literature on antidepressants in pregnancy, concluding that there is a preponderance of evidence that antidepressants are safe for the mother and fetus, with few serious effects having been observed. Some researchers have been concerned about risks of persistent pulmonary hypertension or autism among offspring of women who took antidepressants during pregnancy, but studies have shown that the absolute risk of either is small.  Stay tuned—on Wednesday we’ll discuss a new large and comprehensive study in which most SSRIs showed no link to birth defects, but fluoxetine and paroxetine were associated with risks of certain birth defects.

Editor’s Note: For mild depression during pregnancy, exercise and psychotherapy might be optimal, along with folate and vitamin D3. For moderate depression, omega-3 fatty acids might also be helpful, but it now appears that rTMS would be less risky than electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), which in the past has been a typical recommendation for pregnant women, but which exposes the fetus to the effects of anesthesia and seizure. In her summary Kim recommended that women with a pattern of recurrent depression continue antidepressant treatment, especially since a mother’s depression itself poses non-trivial risks to the fetus.

Personalizing Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Better Results

August 14, 2015 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 


At the 3rd Annual Meeting of the Clinical TMS Society this past May, this editor (Robert M. Post) discussed remission rates for repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (RTMS), which at 30% leave room for improvement. It may be possible to personalize treatment parameters to achieve better success in individual patients.

RTMS is a non-invasive procedure in which a magnetic coil placed near a patient’s head delivers electrical currents to their brain. High frequency stimulation (10Hz to 20Hz) increases brain activity as measured on PET scans, and low frequency stimulation (1Hz) decreases it, so it might be possible to choose the best frequency for an individual patient based on their baseline level of brain activity. If this is not possible, patients who fail to respond to one frequency might be switched over to the other frequency.

RTMS can be given during active positive cognitive behavioral therapy. Patients primed with positive thoughts and feelings may find that rTMS enhances these. (Some practitioners in the audience indicated that they already combine therapy and rTMS and have seen good results).

RTMS might enhance extinction learning, or the breaking of a habitual way of thinking, as it stimulates the media prefrontal cortex, a critical area for new learning. D-cycloserine, a partial glutamate agonist, has been shown to enhance extinction, and since rTMS releases glutamate and BDNF, it might also do the same.

It may also be possible to use rTMS in conjunction with medications (such as valproate) that affect epigenetic changes on the histones around which DNA is wrapped (because valproate is a histone de-acetylase inhibitor, preventing the removal of acetyl groups from the histones and allowing them to be transcribed more easily). Valproate enhances extinction learning in animals, so the stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex and the increase in BDNF and glutamate that occur with rTMS may interact to potentiate this extinction learning.

One could also envision using rTMS to enhance learning during the memory re-consolidation window that opens 5 minutes to an hour after a person actively recalls old memories, and which can lead to more permanent memory alterations in anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and substance abuse.

Since patients are awake and able to talk during rTMS, making use of evoked thoughts and memories specifically for a given patient may lead to enhanced clinical effects, because these neural pathways are more selective activated and potentiated, leading to what is called experience-dependent neuroplasticity.

Another Expert Opinion on PTSD Treatment: Prazosin, SSRIs, and Mirtazapine

August 7, 2015 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 


Researcher Albert Sattin has had extensive experience treating veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs medical system. He believes that what is known as “treatment resistance” is really under-treatment, and he described his recommended regimen for thorough treatment of PTSD to this editor (Robert M. Post) at the 2015 meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry in May.

One of the key elements in the regimens he prescribes for patients with PTSD is prazosin, an alpha-1 antagonist drug used to treat hypertension. Extensive placebo-controlled data by another researcher, Murray Raskind, and colleagues supports the use of prazosin in PTSD. It is typically used to prevent nightmares, but Raskind, Sattin, and others find it has a broad range of positive effects in most domains of PTSD.

Sattin’s key insight is that prazosin should be administered three times a day because of its short half-life. This allows for the treatment of daytime as well as sleep-related PTSD symptoms. Sattin has patients choose from three schedules: 6am, 2pm, 10pm; 7am, 3pm, 11pm; or 8am, 4pm, 12am. Prazosin comes in 1mg, 2mg, and 5mg tablets, but patients must begin by taking the 1mg doses to reduce the risk of orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure upon standing up), slowly increasing the dose as tolerated and if needed for symptom improvement.

Raskind reported in a poster at the same meeting that in a study of active duty combat soldiers, elevated blood pressure at baseline predicted that a patient would respond well to prazosin, so for patients with elevated blood pressure, Sattin starts with prazosin.

For other patients, Sattin begins by prescribing one of the two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) approved by the Federal Drug Administration for use in PTSD—sertraline (Zoloft) or paroxetine (Paxil)—and then adds the antidepressant mirtazapine (Remeron) if necessary. If the patient still remains symptomatic, Sattin then adds prazosin to the regimen with the added warning to take time sitting up or standing up to avoid potential dizziness from low blood pressure. Read more

Mindfulness Interventions May Reduce Substance Use and Cravings

August 5, 2015 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 


A 2014 meta-analysis of the literature to date on mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for substance use disorders suggests that these interventions can reduce consumption of alcohol, cocaine, amphetamines, marijuana, cigarettes, and opiates, compared to several types of controls. The research by Alberto Chiesa and Alessandro Serretti, published in the journal Substance Use and Misuse, includes 24 studies published before 2012. The authors also found some evidence that  MBIs are associated with reduced craving and increased mindfulness. Most of the studies included in the meta-analysis were small, so their generalizability is limited.

A 2014 article by S. Bowen and colleagues in the journal JAMA Psychiatry compared mindfulness-based relapse prevention with standard relapse prevention and treatment as usual for people recovering from substance abuse. Mindfulness-based relapse prevention combines the cognitive behavioral approach of standard relapse prevention with MBIs that have been successful in other studies.

Bowen et al. found that both standard relapse prevention and mindfulness-based relapse prevention lowered the risk of relapse and reduced days of substance use at 6 months, compared to treatment as usual. The standard treatment delayed first drug use, but the mindfulness intervention decreased use at the 12-month mark compared to both standard relapse prevention and treatment as usual.

Substance Abuse Is a Treatable Brain Disorder

August 3, 2015 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 
(click to expand)

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Depression and bipolar disorder come with a high incidence of substance abuse. It is important to realize that there are now good medicines to treat the addictions as well as the primary mood disorders they accompany. At the 2015 meeting of the American Psychiatric Association, Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute of Drug Abuse, encouraged psychiatrists to think of addiction as a “disease of the brain that disrupts the systems that allow people to exert self-control,” saying that this would help reduce stigma both for insurance companies and for the wider public.

Most treatment of substance abuse in bipolar disorder is off-label. Doctors must infer indirect evidence of the possible efficacy of each drug in bipolar disorder from studies in those with only the primary addiction, for example, cocaine abuse without bipolar disorder.

The table at right is a preliminary rating of 1) the strength of the evidence for the efficacy of each drug in the primary addiction and 2) the likely utility of the drug for the treatment of addictions in people with bipolar disorder. For example, the drug baclofen has excellent evidence of efficacy in cocaine addiction, but gets a D for utility in bipolar disorder because baclofen can exacerbate depression.

This list is provisional, and the subjective grades for each drug are likely to change as more research is collected on these treatments. Consult a doctor if you are seeking treatment for bipolar disorder and/or substance abuse.

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