Lithium Effective In Adolescent Mania And Increases White Matter Volume

November 20, 2014 · Posted in Current Treatments, Potential Treatments · Comment 

young man

At the 2014 meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, researcher Adelaine Robb reported that in 81 children with mania (aged 7-17), lithium was superior to placebo in reducing the severity of mania measured on the Young Mania Rating Scale. There had been some debate about the efficacy of lithium in young children with mania, but this study clearly indicates lithium’s effectiveness. The drug is approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for use in patients with bipolar disorder aged 12 and up.

Another researcher, Vivian Kafrantaris, found that in children who averaged 14.5 years of age, lithium increased the volume of the corpus callosum, a bundle of neural fibers that connects the brain’s right and left hemispheres. Lithium also normalized white matter integrity in other neural fiber tracts—the cingulum bundle and the superior longitudinal fasciculus. The authors concluded that lithium may “facilitate microstructural remodeling of white matter tracts involved in emotional regulation.”

Editor’s Note: There is much research showing that in adults, lithium has positive effects on the brain, including increases in hippocampal and cortical grey matter volume. Now it appears that lithium can improve white matter integrity in the developing brain as well.

Multivitamin and Mineral Preparations for Childhood Bipolar Disorder

November 18, 2014 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

Little girl taking drugsResearcher Charles Popper gave a talk at the 2014 meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry on the benefits of nutritional supplements designed to provide multiple vitamins and minerals to children with bipolar disorder and other dyscontrol syndromes, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder. Popper reviewed the literature on the substantial incidence of vitamin and mineral deficiencies among these children.

A modicum of data support the effectiveness of supplements for children with these disorders. One of these supplements is called EMPowerPlus and is sold online. It is moderately expensive and must be given under the supervision of a knowledgeable treating physician. While it is relatively safe in medication-free children, Popper says it can exacerbate withdrawal reactions from some psychotropic medications.

In addition, EMPowerPlus greatly increases lithium-related side effects, in patients taking lithium, the dose must be reduced to about one-tenth of a normal dose for those who are adding EMPowerPlus.

Popper and another researcher, Mary Fristad, have both seen excellent responses to this type of supplementation in children with bipolar disorder who have been unresponsive to more traditional drugs.

In another study by Rita Aouad et al., 72.3% of 980 children with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses had insufficient vitamin D levels (values < 30 nanograms/ml) and 26.7% had vitamin D deficiency (values < 20 nanograms/ml). These data support the rationale for vitamin D supplementation, especially in those who have low levels to start with.

 

Differentiating ADHD and Bipolar Disorder

November 6, 2014 · Posted in Current Treatments, Diagnosis · Comment 

teen pulled in several directions

Three articles in the September 2014 issue of the journal Psychiatric Annals (Volume 44 Issue 9) discussed differentiating pediatric bipolar disorder from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The first article, by Regina Sala et al., said that reasons to suspect bipolar disorder in a child with ADHD include:

  1. The ADHD symptoms appear for the first time after age 12.
  2. The ADHD symptoms appear abruptly in an otherwise healthy child.
  3. The ADHD symptoms initially responded to stimulnts and then did not.
  4. The ADHD symptoms come and go and occur with mood changes.
  5. A child with ADHD begins to have periods of exaggerated elation, grandiosity, depression, decreased need for sleep, or inappropriate sexual behaviors.
  6. A child with ADHD has recurring severe mood swings, temper outbursts, or rages.
  7. A child with ADHD has hallucinations or delusions.
  8. A child with ADHD has a strong family history of bipolar disorder in his or her family, particularly if the child does not respond to appropriate ADHD treatments.

The second article, by this editor Robert Post, Robert Findling, and David Luckenbaugh, emphasized the greater severity and number of symptoms in childhood onset bipolar disorder versus ADHD. Children who would later develop bipolar disorder had brief and extended periods of mood elevation and decreased sleep in the early years of their lives. These, along with pressured speech, racing thoughts, bizarre behavior, and grandiose or delusional symptoms emerged differentially from age three onward. In contrast, the typical symptoms of ADHD such as hyperactivity, impulsivity, and decreased attention were equal in both diagnoses.

In the third article, Mai Uchida et al. emphasized the utility of a family history of bipolar disorder as a risk factor. Moreover, a child with depression plus ADHD is at increased risk for a switch into mania on antidepressants if there is a family history of mood disorders, emotional and behavioral dysregulation, subthreshold mania symptoms, or psychosis.

The differential diagnosis of ADHD versus bipolar disorder (with or without comorbid ADHD) is critical, as drug treatment of these disorders is completely different.

Bipolar disorder is treated with atypical antipyschotics; anticonvulsant mood stabilizers, such as valproate, carbamazepine, or lamotrigine; and lithium. Only once mood is stabilized should small doses of stimulants be added to treat residual ADHD symptoms.

ADHD, conversely, is treated with short- or long-acting stimulants such as amphetamine or methylphenidate from the onset, and these may be augmented by the noradrenergic alpha-2 agonists guanfacine or clonidine. The selective noradrenergic re-uptake inhibitor atomoxetine is also approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of ADHD, and the dopamine-active drug bupropion has mild anti-ADHD effects, as do the anti-narcolepsy drugs modafinil and armodafinil.

A Symposium on High Risk Studies: Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder

October 6, 2014 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

family

In a symposium at the 2014 meeting of the International College of Neuropsychopharmacology, four researchers shared insights on children who are at high risk for bipolar disorder because they have a parent with the disorder.

Researcher John Nurnberger has been studying 350 children of parents with bipolar disorder in the US and 141 control children of parents with no major psychiatric disorder, following the participants into adolescence. He found a major affective disorder in 23.4% of the children with parents who have bipolar disorder and 4.4% of the controls. Of the at-risk children, 8.5% had a bipolar diagnosis versus 0% of the controls.

Nurnberger found that disruptive behavior disorders preceded the onset of mood disorders, as did anxiety disorders. These diagnoses predicted the later onset of bipolar disorder in the at-risk children, but not in the controls. A mood disorder in early adolescence predicted a substance abuse disorder later in adolescence among those at risk.

In genome-wide association studies, the genes CACNA1C and ODZ4 are consistently associated with risk of bipolar disorder, but with a very small effect size. Therefore, Nurnberger used 33 different gene variants to generate a total risk score and found that this measure was modestly effective in identifying relative risk of developing bipolar disorder. He hopes that using this improved risk calculation along with family history and clinical variables will allow better prediction of the risk of bipolar onset in the near future.

Researcher Ann Duffy reported on her Canadian studies of children who have a parent with bipolar disorder and thus are at high risk for developing the disorder. In contrast to the studies of Nurnberger et al. and many others in American patients, she found almost no childhood onset of bipolar disorder before late adolescence or early adulthood. She found that anxiety disorders emerge first, followed by depression, and then only much later bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder occurred with comorbid substance abuse disorders in only about 10-20% of cases in 1975, but substance abuse increased to 50% of bipolar cases in 2005. The incidence of comorbid substance disorder and the year at observation correlated strongly, indicating a trend toward increased substance abuse over the 30-year period.

Duffy found that having parents who were ill as opposed to recovered was associated with a more rapid onset of mood disorder in the offspring, usually in early adulthood. Duffy emphasized the need to intervene earlier in children of parents with bipolar disorder, but this is rarely done in clinical practice. Read more

Korean Study of Mental Disorders in Children of Bipolar Parents

September 26, 2014 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

Korean mother and child

Korea, like the US, has a moderate incidence of childhood-onset bipolar disorder among children who are at high risk because they have a parent with bipolar disorder. In a recent study by Young-Sun Cho et al. presented at the 2014 meeting of the International College of Neuropsychopharmacology (CINP), 59 out of 100 children with a parent who had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder met the criteria for a mental disorder themselves.

Mood disorders were most common. Of the 59 children with mental disorders, 22 were diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and 16 were diagnosed with a depressive disorder. Others included four with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), four with an anxiety disorder, two with disruptive behavior disorders, one with a tic disorder, one with an autistic disorder, and one with schizophrenia and an anxiety disorder.

Editor’s Note: In contrast to studies in Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and Canada, where few children are diagnosed with bipolar disorders (even among those who are at high risk because of a family history of bipolar disorder), 22% of high-risk children in Korea were diagnosed with bipolar disorder. This is comparable to or higher than rates at which high-risk children in the US are diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Studies from both the Bipolar Collaborative Network (in which this editor Robert Post is an investigator) and researcher Boris Birmaher et al. found that parents with bipolar disorder often had a variety of other disorders, such as anxiety, alcohol abuse, or substance abuse. These other illnesses also increase the risk of early-onset bipolar disorder in offspring, and this may account for the higher incidence of early-onset bipolar disorder among high-risk children in the US.

International Bipolar Foundation Advocates for Prompt Treatment of Children

April 28, 2014 · Posted in Political Commentary · Comment 

Muffy WalkerMuffy Walker gave an inspirational talk at the 2014 meeting of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders about the International Bipolar Foundation (IBPF, formerly known as the California Bipolar Foundation) she started with three other mothers of children with bipolar disorder. The organization advocates for better understanding and treatment of the illness in children. Treatment is too often delayed and insufficient, as was the case with Walker’s son, who started having trouble at age four and was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and conduct disorder (CD) before he became severely manic while taking the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac). The foundation has a monthly e-newsletter. Their website is http://ibpf.org.

Differentiating Bipolar Disorder and ADHD in Childhood

April 16, 2014 · Posted in Diagnosis · Comment 

screaming boy

At the 2014 meeting of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, researcher B.N. Kim discussed symptoms that could distinguish between bipolar disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood. Both disorders are characterized by decreased attention, concentration, and frustration tolerance, and increased activity, impulsiveness, and irritability.

Kim shared several differential symptoms that are more indicative of a bipolar diagnosis and that are inconsistent with a simple ADHD diagnosis (and this editor Robert Post has added several more). Signs and symptoms that suggest bipolar disorder and not ADHD include: decreased need for sleep, brief and extended periods of euphoria, hypersexuality, delusions, hallucinations, suicidal or homicidal impulses and/or actions, extreme aggression, and multiple areas of extreme behavioral dyscontrol. ADHD, on the other hand, is characterized by more difficulty focusing attention, and by less extreme symptoms in general.

Children of Bipolar Parents Are At Risk for Depression and Bipolar Disorder

April 7, 2014 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

mother and daughter

The Pittsburgh Bipolar Offspring study, led by Boris Birmaher of the University of Pittsburgh, investigated risk of illness in the offspring of parents with bipolar disorder. The study included 233 parents with bipolar disorder and 143 controls. In addition to bipolar disorder, parents in the study had many other disorders, including anxiety (70%), panic (40%), a disruptive behavior disorder (35%), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD (25%), and substance use disorder (35%).

The offspring averaged age 12 at entry in the study. Offspring of parents with bipolar disorder had more illness than those of control parents, including bipolar spectrum disorders (10.6% versus 0.8%), depression (10.6% versus 3.6%), anxiety disorder (25.8% versus 10.8%), oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder (19.1% versus 8.0%), and ADHD (24.5% versus 6.7%). Of these differences, only bipolar spectrum disorders and anxiety were statistically significant after correcting for differences in the parents’ other diagnoses.

Two factors predicted bipolar spectrum disorders in the offspring: younger age of a parent at birth of child and bipolar disorder in both parents. Older children and those with diagnoses of anxiety or oppositional defiant disorder were more likely to be diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

On long-term follow-up that continued on average until the offspring reached age 20, 23% of those participants who had a parent with bipolar disorder developed any type of bipolar disorder, versus only 1.2% of the children of controls. Of these 23%, about two-thirds had a depressive episode prior to the onset of their bipolar disorder.

Of the offspring of parents with bipolar disorder who developed a bipolar spectrum illness, 12.3% developed bipolar I or II disorders, while 10.7% were diagnosed with bipolar not otherwise specified (NOS). Of those with bipolar NOS, which some consider to be sub-threshold bipolar disorder, about 45% converted to a bipolar I or II diagnosis after several years of prospective follow-up. These data, along with the finding that children with bipolar NOS are highly impaired and take more than a year on average to remit, stress the importance of vigorously treating this subtype, even if it does not meet the full threshold for bipolar I or bipolar II.

Birmaher indicated that although about 50% of the offspring of a bipolar patient had no diagnosis, the high incidence of multiple psychiatric difficulties developing over childhood and adolescence spoke to the importance of attempts at early intervention and prevention. Studies of effective treatment and prevention strategies are desperately needed. So far only family focused therapy (FFT), an intervention developed by researcher David Miklowitz, has shown significant benefits over standard treatment in children with a positive family history of bipolar disorder who already have a diagnosis of anxiety, depression, or bipolar not otherwise specified.

Low Omega-3s in Children Associated with Poor Cognitive Performance

February 14, 2014 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

girl eating fish

Omega-3 fatty acids (especially the type known as DHA) are essential for brain development and functioning, but most people eating a modern western diet consume low amounts of these compared to omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-3s are anti-inflammatory while omega-6s are pro-inflammatory. A large UK study published in the journal PLOS One in 2013 reported that healthy 7- to 9-year-olds with lower levels of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in their blood (including DHA, DPA, and EPA) had lower reading ability and working memory, and also had more behavior problems.

The oils in fish are the best source of omega-3 fatty acids, and most of the children with poor reading ability in the study fell short of the UK nutritional guideline that recommends eating two portions of fish per week.

Girls in the study had more dramatic deficits in omega-3 levels than boys. In adults, women tend to metabolize long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids more easily than men, but this difference is driven by hormones, and because the girls in the study had not yet reached child-bearing age, they did not reflect this benefit.

Omega-3 deficits in children have been connected with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and supplementation with extra omega-3 fatty acids in the diet has led to improvements in ADHD.

Iron Deficiency Linked to Psychiatric Disorders in Children

February 11, 2014 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

iron deficiency

Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional deficiency in industrialized countries and can cause problems with cognitive and intellectual development. New research published in the journal BMC Psychiatry shows that it has psychiatric ramifications as well. Children and adolescents with iron deficiency anemia are at greater risk for psychiatric disorders, including depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, and autism.

Iron supplementation should be implemented in children with iron deficiency anemia in order to prevent any possible psychiatric repercussions, and similarly, psychiatrists should check iron levels in young patients with psychiatric disorders.

Iron provides myelin for white matter in the brain and plays a role in the function of neurotransmitters.

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