Immune Therapy Studied in Alzheimer’s Disease Fails

July 18, 2013 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

confused older man

Following some research that inflammatory changes occur in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, immunotherapy with intravenous immunoglobin (IVIG), a treatment typically used to treat autoimmune diseases and neurological problems, was investigated in Alzheimer’s. The treatment consists of a mix of antibodies derived from the blood plasma of thousands of young, healthy blood donors, which are then delivered in a slow intravenous infusion. IVIG not only includes antibodies to particular proteins implicated in Alzheimer’s disease, but it also has general anti-inflammatory effects.

A particular dosage of IVIG (0.4g/kg every two weeks) seemed to completely stop progression of Alzheimer’s in the four patients who received it consistently for three years as part of a small open study. (Twenty other patients received other doses of IVIG or received placebo for part of the time, and the cognitive functioning of these patients deteriorated.) However, a large, double-blind, randomized study of IVIG did not show that the treatment had greater efficacy than placebo.