Antipsychotic Drug Pimavanserin Seems to Reduce Psychosis in People with Alzheimer’s

August 1, 2017 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

elderly womanThe antipsychotic drug pimavanserin was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration last year as a treatment for hallucinations and delusions in Parkinson’s disease. Now it looks as though it may also help people with Alzheimer’s disease. Pimavanserin works differently than other antipsychotic medications—a selective serotonin inverse agonist, it acts at serotonin HT2A receptors to produce effects opposite to those that serotonin would produce at the same receptor.

In a trial of 181 patients with Alzheimer’s and psychotic symptoms, those who received 34 mg/day of pimavanserin had a significant improvement in psychotic symptoms in six weeks compared to those who received placebo.

Over 12 weeks of treatment, pimavanserin did not impair cognition, as atypical antipsychotics can do.

Pimavanserin was well tolerated. The most common side effects were falls, urinary tract infections, and agitation. Like other atypical antipsychotics, the drug carries a box warning from the FDA that there is an increased risk of death when the drug is used to treat older people with dementia-related psychosis.

The FDA has designated pimavanserin a breakthrough therapy and is giving it priority review. These designations can speed up the development and review of a drug and are granted when a drug looks like it will be substantially better or safer than existing treatments for a serious condition.