Low Vitamin D Levels in Childhood Can Predict Hardening of the Arteries in Adulthood

May 8, 2015 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

vitamin D

A new study from Finland suggests that low vitamin D levels in childhood and adolescence can predict atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, in adulthood. The study, by Markus Juonala and colleagues in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, included 2,148 people whose vitamin D levels were measured at ages 3–18. They were checked for atherosclerosis at ages 30–45. Those participants with the lowest levels of vitamin D in their youth were at much higher risk for thickened arteries as adults. The finding was independent of other cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, high blood pressure, poor eating, lack of exercise, and obesity.

Editor’s Note: While it is not yet clear if low vitamin D levels directly cause the development of atherosclerosis, it is important to maintain sufficient vitamin D in childhood for a host of reasons, including strong bones. Children with sufficient vitamin D levels are more likely to have normal moods and behavior than those deficient in vitamin D.

Vitamin D Important for Brain Function, and Often Deficient

May 6, 2014 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

vitamin D

Vitamin D plays an important role in many brain functions, including synapse creation, calcium signaling, reduction of free radicals, neurotransmitter production, immune regulation, and brain development. Deficiencies in vitamin D have been linked to depression and schizophrenia. Some research has suggested that vitamin D supplementation can improve depressive symptoms, but there is still debate about a possible role for vitamin D in treating bipolar disorder.

At the 2014 meeting of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, researcher Baseok Cha discussed the importance of vitamin D supplementation in bipolar patients, who often have deficient or insufficient levels. People receive 50 to 90% of their vitamin D from sunlight, and the rest from diet and supplements. Too much sunscreen can be a problem if it prevents a person from receiving enough vitamin D from sunlight.

The type of vitamin in supplements, D3, is converted to 25 hydroxy vitamin D in the liver, and then to 1,25 hydroxy vitamin D in the kidney. Levels of 25 hydroxy vitamin D below 20 indicate deficiency while levels between 20 and 29 indicate insufficiency. Low levels of 25 hydroxy vitamin D3 in newborns is a risk factor for schizophrenia, and vitamin D supplementation reduces this risk. Fish oils increase vitamin D, and it is possible that some of the therapeutic effects of omega-3 fatty acids in depression relate to vitamin D.

Two out of four recent studies of vitamin D supplementation have been positive, the last by Khoraminya et al. in the Australia and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry in 2013, in which daily doses of 1,500 IU were used. Cha et al. found significantly lower levels of 25 hydroxy vitamin D in a Korean study of 21 patients with schizophrenia, 86 patients with bipolar disorder, and 42 patients with depression (mean levels about 15 µg/ml) compared to 31 controls (mean levels about 20 µg/ml).

 

A Possible Explanation for Vitamin D’s Antidepressant Effects

May 5, 2014 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

vitamin DVitamin D plays an important role in the nervous system, regulating the production of neurotrophins, calcium channels, and calcium binding proteins, and it may have antidepressant effects. Researchers are learning more about how the vitamin’s effects take place.

At the 2014 meeting of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, Yilmazer et al. reported that vitamin D treatment increased the production of glia-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Neurotrophins like GDNF enhance the survival and growth of neurons. Since other neurotrophins (i.e. brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEG-F)) are low in depression, vitamin D’s effect on GDNF could be important to its antidepressant effects.

Lithium Increases Parathormone and Reduces Vitamin D Levels

February 7, 2014 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

elderly woman with pills

Lithium treatment is associated with a moderate incidence of hyperparathyroidism, usually observed as an elevated concentration of calcium in the blood in addition to elevated parathormone levels, and often associated with the development of a tumor (adenoma) of the parathyroid gland.

In a recent study by Van Melick et al. published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, among 111 patients with an average age of 75 years, 24-hour calcium excretion was elevated in only 3% of the patients, but levels of parathormone were elevated in 48%. Duration of lithium treatment was associated with lower vitamin 25OH D. Vitamin D is important for healthy bones and good cognitive functioning.

Editor’s Note: Lithium-induced hyperparathyroid should be investigated in those with elevated calcium levels, and if found, surgical removal of the parathyroid gland may be indicated. Low vitamin D is common in the US population. It is also particularly low in patients with mania and elderly patients on who have been on lithium for more than ten years. (Levels are below normal in 77% of these elderly individuals.) Assessment of vitamin D levels in those on long-term lithium is advisable, in addition to monitoring the thyroid, kidney function, and calcium metabolism.

Safe Upper Limit of Vitamin D Identified

September 5, 2013 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

vitamin D

A recent study confirmed that low levels of vitamin D can increase risk of death and determined a safe upper limit for vitamin D levels. The research, published by Yosef Dror et al. in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, showed that safe blood levels of vitamin D are between 20 and 36ng/mL. People with levels above or below this range were at greater risk of mortality or acute coronary syndrome.

Dror suggests that calcium supplement dosages should be specifically tailored to individuals based on levels in their blood.

The research comes from 54 months of data collection during which 422, 822 members of Clalit Health Services, an Israeli health maintenance organization, were tested for vitamin D levels. Only 3% percent of this population were at risk because of high levels of the vitamin, while 62% were at risk due to low levels of vitamin D.

Editor’s Note: Watch out for low vitamin D3. Even if a patient’s levels of D3 are in the normal range, supplementation can help antidepressants work better. According to a study published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, adding 1500 IU of vitamin D3 to the treatment regimen of depressed patients taking fluoxetine (Prozac) improved their response significantly.

Vitamin D3 Is Low In Children And Adolescents With Mania, But Supplements Help

March 12, 2013 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 
Vitamin D supplements

Vitamin D supplements

Vitamin D3 is low in children and adolescents with mania, but taking a supplement could help. Vitamin D3, which we absorb via food and sunlight, is converted by the liver to a form called 25-OH-D. In a small study, Elif Sikoglu et al. found that children and teens with mania had lower levels of 25-OH-D in their blood compared to typically developing youth of similar ages. This deficit was associated with lower brain GABA levels measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. GABA dysfunction has been implicated in the manic phase of bipolar disorder. An 8-week trial of Vitamin D3 supplements significantly reduced manic symptoms and tended to increase GABA levels.

Editor’s Note:  Other data have suggested that children with psychosis have low Vitamin D3, and in a recent clinical trial in adults, Vitamin D3 supplementation improved antidepressant response more than placebo.  Many children in the US are Vitamin D deficient. Test them and, if necessary, treat them, especially if they have bipolar disorder.

Vitamin D3 has Positive Effects in Depressed Patients on Prozac

March 8, 2013 · Posted in Current Treatments, Peer-Reviewed Published Data · Comment 

vitamin D

A recent study of patients taking fluoxetine (Prozac) for major depression found that adding 1500 IU of vitamin D3 to their treatment regimen improved their response significantly. The article was published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry.

According to the Mayo Clinic:

The term “vitamin D” refers to several different forms of this vitamin. Two forms are important in humans: ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3). Vitamin D2 is synthesized by plants. Vitamin D3 is synthesized by humans in the skin when it is exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB) rays from sunlight. Foods may be fortified with vitamin D2 or D3.

Editors Note: Here is another augmenting agent that could be considered for the treatment of those with residual depression. While vitamin D has not been studied directly in bipolar depression, we could ask, “Why not try it?” Other nutritional supplements in this category might be folate and N-acetylcysteine.

Vitamin D supplements are definitely indicated for the large percentage of those in the US who are vitamin D deficient. Given the data from this randomized trial, vitamin D3 could be considered in those with normal levels of vitamin D as well.

Vitamin D Deficiency Found in Adolescents with Serious Mental Disorders

October 28, 2011 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

Vitamin DBarbara Gracious of the University of Rochester Medical Center reported at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) in October 2010 that adolescents with severe mental illness are more likely to have vitamin D deficiency than adolescents in the general population are. Gracious et al. collected information from severely mentally ill teens in inpatient and day hospital settings. Low vitamin D levels (i.e. those below 30 ng/ml) were found in 74% of these children. In addition, those patients who were vitamin D deficient were more than three times as likely to have a psychotic element to their illness.

Editor’s note:  These data suggest the potential importance of assessing vitamin D levels during the diagnosis of patients with childhood-onset bipolar disorder, particularly if there is associated psychotic symptomatology.

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