Exercise Improves Cognition and Normalizes Brain Activity

February 12, 2016 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

exercise improves cognition

Exercise isn’t just good for the body—new research suggests it can improve cognition and normalize brain activity.

At the 2015 meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, researcher Benjamin I. Goldstein reported that 20 minutes of vigorous exercise on a bike improved cognition and decreased hyperactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex in adolescents with and without bipolar disorder.

At the same meeting, researcher Danella M. Hafeman reported that offspring of parents with bipolar disorder who exercised more had lower levels of anxiety.

A plenary address by James J. Hudziak also suggested that exercise, practicing music, and mindfulness training all lead to improvements in brain function and should be an integral part of treatment for children at high risk for bipolar disorder and could be beneficial for all children.

Editor’s Note: Recognizing and responding to mood symptoms is key to the prevention and treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents at high risk for the illness. For these young people, exercise, a nutritious diet, good sleep habits, and family psychoeducation about bipolar disorder symptoms may be a good place to start. Joining our Child Network may also be helpful.

Children at Risk for Bipolar Disorder May Have Adverse Reactions to Antidepressants

February 11, 2016 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

adverse reaction to antidepressantsAt the 2015 meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, researcher Jeffrey R. Strawn reported that among children at high risk for bipolar disorder (because of a family history of the disorder) who are prescribed antidepressants for depression and anxiety, adverse reactions are common. These reactions include irritability, aggression, impulsivity, and hyperactivity, and often lead to discontinuation of the antidepressant treatment.

Younger patients at risk for bipolar disorder were more likely to have an adverse reaction to antidepressants. Risk of an adverse reaction decreased 27% with each year of age.

Topiramate added to Quetiapine Can Reduce Marijuana Craving in Young People

February 11, 2016 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

marijuana craving

At the 2015 meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, researcher Melissa P. DelBello reported that compared to placebo, the anticonvulsant topiramate reduced marijuana craving in young people aged 12–21 who were already taking the antipsychotic quetiapine. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed that topiramate altered the activation of brain regions common to both drug craving and mood dysregulation. Topiramate could be a good treatment to reduce marijuana abuse. The antioxidant n-acetylcysteine (NAC) is another option.

RTMS Improves Executive Function in Kids with Schizophrenia and Autism

February 10, 2016 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

rTMSResearcher Stephanie Ameis reported at the 2015 meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry that following repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a treatment in which a magnetic coil placed over the scalp delivers electric pulses to the brain, children with schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders showed improvements in executive function, including working memory. The rTMS treatment targeted the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

Offspring of Bipolar Parents at High Risk for Psychiatric Disorders

February 10, 2016 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

children of parents with bipolar disorder are at high risk for the illness

Researcher Juan David Palacio reported at the 2015 meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry that compared to offspring of non-ill parents, children of parents with bipolar I disorder are at high risk for psychiatric disorders, particularly bipolar spectrum disorders and substance use disorders. They were also at risk for symptoms of anxiety disorders and conduct disorder. Palacio’s findings from Colombia mirror those from other studies of familial risk and suggest the importance of vigilance to detect these disorders early and provide appropriate treatment. Our Child Network may help.

Dopamine Partial Agonists: An Overview

February 5, 2016 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

pillsSeveral atypical antipsychotic drugs are partial agonists of dopamine. They provide weak stimulation of dopamine receptors in the brain and prevent dopamine from overstimulating the receptors by binding to them in its place.

In contrast, most antipsychotic and antimanic drugs are dopamine antagonists, which also bind to dopamine receptors but prevent any stimulation from occurring there.

A.    Aripiprazole (Abilify) was the first partial dopamine agonist approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of schizophrenia, and mania, and as an add-on treatment to antidepressants for the treatment of unipolar depression, but not bipolar depression.

B.    Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) received FDA approval for the treatment of schizophrenia and as an add-on treatment to antidepressants for the treatment of unipolar depression in 2015. It is similar to aripiprazole but has weaker activity at the dopamine D2 receptor. Brexpiprazole is associated with small increases in the hormone prolactin, as opposed to the small decreases in prolactin seen with aripiprazole.

C.    Cariprazine (Vraylar) is FDA-approved for schizophrenia and mania, and it also has positive placebo-controlled data in bipolar depression and as an adjunct to antidepressants in unipolar depression.  It differs from the others in that it is more potent at dopamine D3 receptors than at D2 receptors. It is thought that effects on D3 receptors may provide better antidepressant effects, but this proposition has not yet been tested.

New Drug Cariprazine Approved for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

February 3, 2016 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

cariprazineIn late 2015, the Food and Drug Administration approved the new atypical antipsychotic drug cariprazine for the treatment of schizophrenia and mania in adults. The approval followed a series of clinical trials that showed that the drug reduced symptoms of each illness compared to placebo.

The most common side effects of cariprazine reported in the trials included tremor, slurred speech, and involuntary muscle movements.

Facial Emotion Recognition Deficient in Bipolar Disorder

February 1, 2016 · Posted in Peer-Reviewed Published Data · Comment 

facial expressionsemotions

In the past decade, several studies have indicated that people with bipolar disorder have less ability to recognize the emotions expressed on people’s faces than do healthy controls. A 2013 meta-analysis by Cecilia Samamé and colleagues concluded that facial emotion recognition was deficient in people with bipolar disorder regardless of their current state. A 2011 quantitative review article by Christian G. Kohler and colleagues revealed that this difficulty distinguishing emotions is general, rather than specific to any one emotion.

A 2015 study by Esther Vierck and colleagues in the journal Psychiatry Research showed that both euthymic patients with bipolar disorder and their first-degree relatives without bipolar disorder performed worse on tests of emotion recognition than did normal controls. The findings in healthy relatives suggest that the deficit may be a familial risk factor for the development of bipolar disorder.

These deficits in facial emotion recognition have also been seen in 4 out of 5 studies of children with early-onset bipolar disorder, including those who are euthymic. 2008 studies by Melissa A. Brotman and colleagues showed that even children just at high risk for bipolar disorder due to a family history of the disorder had deficient emotion recognition.

This literature indicates that deficiencies in facial emotion recognition consistently accompany bipolar disorder and may also be a sign that a child or teenager is at risk for bipolar disorder. Since these deficits can create social and interpersonal difficulties, it may be useful to teach better emotion recognition skills to people with bipolar disorder or those at high risk for the illness.

Marijuana Use Worsens PTSD Symptoms in Veterans

January 29, 2016 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

marijuana worsens PTSD symptoms

A 2015 study by Samuel T. Wilkinson and colleagues in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry reports that among war veterans who completed a special treatment program for post-traumatic stress disorder, those who continued or began using marijuana after treatment had more severe PTSD symptoms, were more violent, and used drugs and alcohol more often. Those who stopped using marijuana or never used it had the lowest levels of PTSD symptoms in the study.

Editor’s Note: Scientific information about marijuana is almost never reported in the media. Evidence of the adverse effects of heavy marijuana use are robust and consistent.

Some of these include:

  • A doubling of the risk of psychosis compared to non-users. People with a common variation in the enzyme COMT, which metabolizes dopamine, have an even higher rate of psychosis.
  • An increased risk of bipolar disorder onset.
  • A worse course of bipolar disorder.
  • An increased risk of schizophrenia.
  • Memory deficits that remain even after marijuana use has ceased.
  • Loss of motivation (exactly what someone with depression doesn’t need).
  • Anatomical changes in brain structures.
  • A worse course of PTSD and increased violence in those with PTSD.

Bottom line: Those who say marijuana is benign may be ill-informed. People with mood disorders, proneness to paranoia, or PTSD should stay away from marijuana.

Marijuana May Speed Cortical Loss in Boys at Risk for Schizophrenia

January 28, 2016 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

marijuana

In boys, a decrease in the thickness of the cortex is a part of normal maturation. However, according to a recent study, this process is sped up in boys at high risk for schizophrenia when they use marijuana before the age of 16.

Early use of marijuana has been linked to subsequent development of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia begins about 5 years earlier in males than in females, and the male brain goes through more structural changes during adolescence.

A 2015 article by Tomáš Paus in the journal JAMA Psychiatry incorporated data from three studies, which took place in parts of Canada and England and eight European cities. The studies all included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the participants, a measure of their genetic risk of developing schizophrenia, and questions about their past marijuana use. In boys at high risk for schizophrenia based on their genetic profile, cortical thickness dropped more among the ones who used high amounts of marijuana before the age of 16 compared to those who did not.

Paus hypothesizes that the development of schizophrenia is a “two-hit process.” People who develop schizophrenia may have an early risk factor, such as their genetic profile or a problem that occurs in utero, and a later stressor such as drug use in adolescence.

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