Theta-burst RTMS Improved Depression

July 9, 2014 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

rTMSTheta-burst stimulation is a type of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) currently being investigated for the treatment of severe depression. In rTMS a magnetic pulse applied to the scalp causes neurons to fire. A recent study of 60 patients by Cheng-Ta Li et al. published in the journal Brain compared continuous, intermittent, and combined theta-burst treatment with a sham treatment. While all four groups of patients with treatment-resistant depression improved, indicating some placebo effect, patients in the group who received intermittent stimulation over the left prefrontal cortex and those who received a combination of intermittent left prefrontal cortex stimulation and continuous right prefrontal stimulation showed the greatest improvement in their depression. Those patients with greater prior treatment resistance responded less well across all of the treatments.

Editor’s Note: Studies continue to explore the optimum parameters for rTMS, but large studies and meta-analyses continue to show that the treatment has positive effects in depression.

Ketamine for Chronic PTSD

July 2, 2014 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

setting up a ketamine drip

We reported in BNN Volume 17, Issue 6 in 2013 on researchers’ efforts to treat symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder using the drug ketamine. This research by Adriana Feder et al. has now been published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

In the study of 41 patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, patients showed a greater reduction in symptoms 24 hours after receiving intravenous (IV) ketamine than after taking IV midazolam, a benzodiazepine used as an active placebo control because it produces anti-anxiety and sedating effects similar to ketamine’s. The patients ranged in age from 18 to 55 years of age and were free of other medication for two weeks before the study. Ketamine was also associated with reduction in depressive symptoms and with general clinical improvement, and side effects were minimal.

TDCS Promising for a Range of Illnesses

June 30, 2014 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

transcranial direct-current stimulationTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) shows promise for a range of problems. In new research presented at the 2014 meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, it was reported to be effective for improving cognition in bipolar disorder, alleviating depression, and reducing hallucinations.

How TDCS Works

At the meeting, researcher Marom Bikson discussed tDCS technology. The treatment can be delivered with a 12-volt battery. The anode directs current inward and is excitatory, while the cathode directs current outward and is inhibitory. The dendrites at the top of neurons under the anode are hyperpolarized by the tDCS, leading to relative depolarization of the cell soma, thus increasing excitation. TDCS, unlike repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), which causes cells to fire, is only neuromodulatory, inducing minor changes in membrane polarization.

TDCS Improved Cognition in Bipolar Disorder

At the 2014 meeting of the American Psychiatric Association, Roberto Delle Chiaie et al. reported that two mA tDCS for 20 minutes for 15 days (anode over the left prefrontal cortex and cathode over the right cerebellum) improved immediate and delayed recall, trail making with a pointer, and motor coordination in 17 euthymic bipolar patients. This very promising result deserves further study and replication.

Antidepressant Effects of TDCS

At the 2014 meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, Collen Loo reported that tDCS had positive effects in depressed patients compared to sham treatment. This complements a 2013 article by Brunoni et al. in JAMA Psychiatry that tDCS plus the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant sertraline (Zoloft) was more effective than either treatment alone.

TDCS for Treatment-Resistant Hallucinations

Jerome Brunelin et al. reported at the meeting that tDCS had positive effects in patients with schizophrenia who had hallucinations that resisted treatment. The positive electrode (anode) was placed over the left prefrontal cortex and the negative electrode (cathode) over the left temperoparietal area, where hallucinations are thought to originate. Stimulation was at two mA for 20 minutes, five days per week for two weeks. Effects lasted as long as 30 days and were associated with reduced functional connectivity of these brain regions.

Low frequency (1Hz) rTMS, which decreases neural activity, also improves refractory hallucinations when applied over the temperoparietal area, which is important for language. Placing the cathode over this area in tDCS is also inhibitory, so comparisons of rTMS with tDCS for suppressing hallucinations would be of great interest and importance.

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Continues To Show Effectiveness In Depression

June 27, 2014 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

rTMSAt the 2014 meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, David G. Brock et al. reported that 41 of 67 depressed patients achieved remission (61.2%) after acute treatment with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation without other medication. After three months of continuation treatment in which patients either received one maintenance TMS session per month or were simply observed, 10 of the 16 receiving active TMS continuation (62.5%) did not relapse, while 7 of the 16 who were only observed (43.8%) did not relapse. While this was not a statistically significant difference, it suggests that continuation TMS should be studied further.

Andrew Leuchter et al. reported that synchronized transcranial magnetic stimulation (sTMS) at a patient’s individual alpha frequency (IAF) was more effective than sham treatment in those with prior treatment resistance (34.2% vs 8.3%) but not different from sham treatment in depressed patients who had never received treatment.

Editor’s Note: This would be important if replicated, as patients with high levels of treatment resistance do not tend to respond well to regular rTMS given at 10Hz and not matched to a patient’s alpha frequency.

RTMS Reduced Smoking

Dinur-Klein Limor reported that 10 Hz (but not 1 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left pre-frontal cortex decreased cigarette consumption when given in combination with a smoking cue.

Lithium Superior to Valproate at Preventing Manias and Depressions

June 25, 2014 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

smiling womanIn a special symposium on bipolar disorder at the 2014 meeting of the American Psychiatric Association, researcher Mike Bauer reviewed a new meta-analysis that showed lithium not only has significant effects in preventing manias, but also depressions. Researcher Geddes et al. had, in a previous study called BALANCE, found that lithium was superior to valproate (Depakote). Together these findings led Bauer to the conclusion that lithium is under-used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, especially in the US, where lithium is prescribed less often than valproate.

An article by researcher Kessing in the British Journal of Psychiatry in 2012 relied on naturalistic follow up data and also showed that lithium was superior to valproate in preventing hospitalizations.

A study by researcher Willem Nolen indicated that in mono-therapy, levels of lithium in the blood needed to be 0.6 meq/L or higher in order for lithium to work better than placebo. Lithium augmentation that produced lower blood levels of 0.3 meq/L was not significant on its main outcome measure of preventing new episodes. However, compared to treatment as usual, those randomized to lithium used lower doses of atypical antipsychotics, and other data indicated that these patients had fewer suicide attempts and increased hippocampal volume.

Bauer noted that lithium-related goiter and low thyroid are easily treated, and that kidney damage while taking lithium can be prevented by avoiding episodes of lithium intoxication. It is easy to conclude that lithium should be used more often, especially given its positive effects against suicide and brain gray matter and hippocampal volume loss.

Inflammation Predicts Depression Persistence

June 9, 2014 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 
IL-6

IL-6

Links between inflammation and depression continue to be identified in new research. Researcher N. Vogelzangs et al. reported in a 2014 article in Neuropharmacology that inflammatory and metabolic dysregulation in antidepressant users predicted an outcome of depression two years later. Elevated levels of the marker of inflammation Il-6, low HDL (or “good”) cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high blood sugar were associated with poor response to medication and chronicity of depression. Of 315 people treated with antidepressants (average age 43), 138 were in remission at 2 years, while 177 (56.2%) were still depressed. People with four or more types of inflammatory or metabolic dysregulations had a 90% chance of still being depressed at 2 years.

Among inflammatory markers including CRP and TNF-alpha, IL-6 alone was associated with chronic depression. Il-6 can cross the blood-brain barrier. We have previously reported that researcher Scott Russo found that in rats in a depression-like state known as defeat stress (brought about by repeated defeat by a larger rodent), blocking Il-6 can prevent depressive behaviors such as social avoidance or loss of preference for sucrose.

Like inflammation, metabolic abnormalities also complicate depression. Lipid dysregulation and hyperglycemia are associated not only with depression persistence, but also with the new onset of depression in humans.

Vogelzangs et al. conclude that these data “ suggest that inflammatory and metabolic dysregulation worsens depression course owing to reduced [antidepressant] response and that alternative intervention treatments may be needed for depressed persons with inflammatory and metabolic dysregulation.”

It is noteworthy that a 2014 meta-analysis of the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib (Celebrex) published by Farhad Faridhosseini et al. in Human Psychopharmacology, showed that the drug, often prescribed for arthritis, is effective for unipolar depression when added to patients’ regular treatment.

It remains to be ascertained whether celecoxib’s effects are seen in depression in general, or if they pertain only to the 30% of depressed patients who show inflammation at baseline. Typical markers of inflammation include Il-6, CRP, TNFa, and Il-1.

Statins, prescribed to lower cholesterol, also have anti-inflammatory effects, and are also effective in preventing depression.

Determining treatment approaches for those patients showing signs of inflammation or metabolic irregularities remains a high priority for study. The preliminary data noted here suggest that treating these dysregulations in those with depression may be useful.

Different Psychotherapies for Different Illness Characteristics

May 16, 2014 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

therapy

Psychotherapy can play an important role in treating mental illness. At the 2014 meeting of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, researcher F. Colom gave a plenary talk indicating that just like pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy should differ depending on characteristics of the illness—both its severity and whether the patient has more manic or more depressive symptoms.

For less severe illness with more depression, Colom explained that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is ideal.

Psychoeducation and family focused therapy (FFT) is recommended for intermediate severity, with a focus on maintaining remission. Family focused therapy also works for early (prodromal) symptoms, as reported by researcher David Miklowitz et al. in 2013.

Lars Kessing et al. recently reported that specialty treatment in a clinic (including psychoeducation and vigilance to breakthrough symptoms that may suggest a new episode is imminent) is highly effective following a first episode of mania.

For more severe illness, Colom recommends cognitive remediation and rehabilitation to decrease illness burden and increase functioning. Functional remediation focuses on communication, includes homework, and teaches skills such as how to deal with money, time, and organization. It also helps improve social cognition.

For the most severe illness, palliative care to relieve symptoms and decrease illness impact is recommended. Colom noted that cognitive behavioral therapy is less effective with patients who have experienced more than 12 episodes (reported by Jan Scott et al. in the British Journal of Psychiatry in 2006), as is psychoeducation (Renares et al. 2010, Colom et al. 2014). These data re-emphasize the importance of early intervention, when these psychotherapeutic approaches are more helpful. Colom stresses the importance of behavioral cognitive therapy (BCT) rather than cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for those late in the illness whose episodes often arrive spontaneously, unprecipitated by psychosocial stress, and one needs more behavioral approaches to the brain’s habit memory system located in the striatum, which may drive highly recurrent illness.

Vitamin D Important for Brain Function, and Often Deficient

May 6, 2014 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

vitamin D

Vitamin D plays an important role in many brain functions, including synapse creation, calcium signaling, reduction of free radicals, neurotransmitter production, immune regulation, and brain development. Deficiencies in vitamin D have been linked to depression and schizophrenia. Some research has suggested that vitamin D supplementation can improve depressive symptoms, but there is still debate about a possible role for vitamin D in treating bipolar disorder.

At the 2014 meeting of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, researcher Baseok Cha discussed the importance of vitamin D supplementation in bipolar patients, who often have deficient or insufficient levels. People receive 50 to 90% of their vitamin D from sunlight, and the rest from diet and supplements. Too much sunscreen can be a problem if it prevents a person from receiving enough vitamin D from sunlight.

The type of vitamin in supplements, D3, is converted to 25 hydroxy vitamin D in the liver, and then to 1,25 hydroxy vitamin D in the kidney. Levels of 25 hydroxy vitamin D below 20 indicate deficiency while levels between 20 and 29 indicate insufficiency. Low levels of 25 hydroxy vitamin D3 in newborns is a risk factor for schizophrenia, and vitamin D supplementation reduces this risk. Fish oils increase vitamin D, and it is possible that some of the therapeutic effects of omega-3 fatty acids in depression relate to vitamin D.

Two out of four recent studies of vitamin D supplementation have been positive, the last by Khoraminya et al. in the Australia and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry in 2013, in which daily doses of 1,500 IU were used. Cha et al. found significantly lower levels of 25 hydroxy vitamin D in a Korean study of 21 patients with schizophrenia, 86 patients with bipolar disorder, and 42 patients with depression (mean levels about 15 µg/ml) compared to 31 controls (mean levels about 20 µg/ml).

 

Newest Meta-Analysis Shows Lithium Is Better than Placebo at Preventing Both Mania and Depression

April 23, 2014 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

lithium pillA 2004 meta-analysis of previous research showed that lithium was better than placebo at preventing affective episodes and preventing manic episodes. The evidence for the drug’s efficacy in preventing depression was less clear. A new meta-analysis by E. Severus et al. (not yet published) confirms the previous findings and provides new evidence that lithium is also better than placebo at preventing depressions.

The study also suggested that lithium is better than anticonvulsant mood stabilizers at preventing relapse and recurrence, but this finding only reached statistical significance in the prevention of new manic and hypomanic episodes.

Editor’s Note: These findings highlight the desirability of greater lithium use. The drug is currently prescribed less often in the US than it is in Europe. In addition to lithium’s efficacy in the long-term preventative treatment of bipolar disorder, there is evidence that lithium is also the best agent for suicide prevention and for neuroprotective effects.

Inflammation Occurs During Both Depression And Mania

April 18, 2014 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

depressed woman

 

 

There is increasing evidence of a link between mood disorders and inflammation in the body.

At the 2014 meeting of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, Shang-Ying Tsai discussed increases in measures of inflammation that occur in bipolar disorder as a function of the clinical state of depression, mania, or euthymia (remission). He found that in both mania and depression, there were elevations in various markers of inflammation: STNF-R1, CRP, IL-Ira and SLR-2r. However, SLR-2r showed some particularly interesting results. In mania, elevation of SLR-2r, a marker of cell-mediated inflammation, was state-related, meaning it increased during an episode of mania and remained normal during euthymia. In depression, SLR-2r elevation was trait-related, or persistently elevated (even in remission).

Editor’s Note: This study adds to a growing list of studies that confirm the presence of inflammation in patients with bipolar disorder compared to normal controls, including a 2012 article by Tsai in the Journal of Affective Disorders. How elevations in inflammatory markers in a given individual should direct specific types of treatment intervention remains to be further clarified.

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