Probiotics May Improve Depression As Well As IBS

December 11, 2017 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

vitamin DA pilot study of people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) suggests that taking a probiotic nutritional supplement can improve depression as well as gastrointestinal upset.
In the 2017 study published in the journal Gastroenterology, researcher Maria Pinto Sanchez and colleagues at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute found that when those with IBS took a probiotic, their co-occurring depression improved more than it did in people with IBS who took a placebo.

Senior author Premysl Bercik suggested the study confirms that the microbiota environment in the gut affects what goes on in the brain, opening new avenues for the treatment of psychiatric diseases.

The study included 44 adults with IBS who also had mild to moderate anxiety and depression. For 10 weeks, half received a daily dose of the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001, while the others received placebo.

After 6 weeks, 64% of the probiotic group saw improvement in their depression, compared to 32% of the placebo group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) showed brain changes associated with the improvement in mood.

The researchers are planning larger trials of probiotics.

TDCS Better Than Placebo But Not as Good as Escitalopram at Improving Unipolar Depression

December 8, 2017 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

An article by André R. Brunoni and colleagues in the New England Journal of Medicine reports that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can treat unipolar depression more effectively than placebo, but not quite as effectively as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant escitalopram. TDCS consists of a constant, low direct current applied to the scalp via electrodes.

The study included 245 patients with moderate to severe depressive symptoms, many of whom also had anxiety disorders. To minimize the placebo effect, patients all participated in sessions wearing tDCS gear and received a daily pill. However, one group received real tDCS treatment but placebo pills, a second group received sham tDCS but real escitalopram pills, and the third group received both sham tDCS and placebo pills.

The real tDCS treatment consisted of 30-minute sessions of tDCS every day for 15 consecutive weekdays, then seven once-a-week treatments. The escitalopram dosage was 10 mg/day for three weeks, then 20 mg daily.

Ten weeks into treatment, those who received escitalopram showed the greatest improvement in depression. Those who received tDCS showed slightly less improvement, but still significantly more than those who received neither treatment. Cognitive performance either improved or stayed the same in all the groups.

In terms of side effects, those who received escitalopram were more likely to report sleepiness or severe constipation. Those who received tDCS reported more skin redness/tingling, itching, tinnitus, and nervousness. Two patients in the tDCS group had new-onset mania during treatment. There were no suicides, hospitalizations, or other serious side effects.

Botox for Depression

December 1, 2017 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

botox injectionSeveral recent clinical trials have suggested that Botox injections between the eyebrows may improve depression. The theory is that decreasing muscle tension could reduce feelings of depression, instead of depression causing muscle tension. In a phase 2 double blind multicenter trial of 258 women with depression, participants were randomized to receive 30 units of Botox, 50 units of Botox, or placebo. Those who received the 30-unit injections showed significantly greater improvement in depression at three weeks and nine weeks compared to those who received placebo. However, it was not superior to placebo at the primary endpoint of the study, six weeks, and the 50-unit dosage was not superior to placebo. Both doses were well tolerated.

Botox is derived from botulinum toxin, which can relax tense muscles. It is also being explored as a treatment for migraine headaches. The manufacturer, Allergan, expects to move forward with phase 3 trials of Botox for depression.

An Overview of Ketamine for Treatment-Resistant Depression

November 27, 2017 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

ketamineA 2017 series of articles by researcher Chittaranjan Andrade in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry reviews the last 10 years of research on ketamine, the anesthetic drug that in smaller doses (0.5 mg/kg of body weight) can bring about rapid antidepressant effects. Ketamine is typically delivered intravenously (though it can also be delivered via inhaler, injected under the skin or into muscles, and least effectively by mouth). Ketamine can improve depression in less than an hour, but its effects usually fade within 3 to 5 days. Repeating infusions every few days can extend ketamine’s efficacy for weeks or months.

Andrade cited a 2016 meta-analysis of nine ketamine studies by T. Kishimoto and colleagues in the journal Psychological Research. The meta-analysis found that compared to placebo, ketamine improved depression beginning 40 minutes after IV administration. Its effects peaked at day 1 and were gone 10–12 days later. Remission rates were better than placebo starting after 80 minutes and lasting 3–5 days.

Several studies have found that ketamine also reduces suicidality.

Andrade reported that both effectiveness and side effects seem to be dose-dependent within a range from 0.1 mg/kg to 0.75 mg/kg.

Side effects of ketamine are typically mild and transient. A 2015 study by Le-Ben Wan and colleagues (also in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry) that Andrade cited reported that in 205 sessions of ketamine administration, the most common side effects were drowsiness, dizziness, poor coordination, blurred vision, and feelings of strangeness or unreality. The feelings of unreality (dissociative effects) diminish with repeated infusions. Heart and blood pressure may also temporarily increase as a result of ketamine administration.

One study found that ketamine could speed up and add to the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant escitalopram (Lexapro). A meta-analysis of 10 randomized controlled trials found that ketamine did not improve the effects of electroconvulsive therapy.

Ketamine has some history as a recreational club drug (sometimes known as ‘K’ or ‘special K’), and can be misused or abused.

While there have been many studies of ketamine’s antidepressant effects, Andrade concludes that none is of a standard to justify US Food and Drug Administration approval for the drug. It is hoped that larger, more rigorous trials will be completed in the next few years. However, ketamine is already being used widely to treat treatment-resistant unipolar and bipolar depression.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Improves Depression When Other Treatments Fail

November 24, 2017 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

VNSVagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an adjunctive therapy for treatment-resistant unipolar and bipolar depression since 2005. The treatment consists of a pacemaker-like device implanted under the skin in the chest that delivers regular, mild electrical pulses to the brain via the left vagus nerve.

A 2017 study by Scott T. Aaronson and colleagues in the American Journal of Psychiatry reports that over a 5-year period, people with treatment-resistant depression who received VNS did better than those who received treatment as usual. The 795 participants at 61 US sites had either a depressive episode that had lasted for at least two years or had had three or more depressive episodes and had failed to respond to at least four treatments, including electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Over five years, those who received VNS had higher response rates (67.6% versus 40.9%) and higher remission rates (43.3% versus 25.7%) compared to those who received treatment as usual.

While the study by Aaronson and colleagues was non-blind and non-randomized, it suggests that VNS could be helpful in the long-term management of treatment-resistant unipolar and bipolar depression.

Editor’s Note: VNS was FDA-approved for treatment-resistant seizures in patients aged 12 and older in 1997 and for children 4 years and older in 2017. It was also approved for cluster headaches in 2017. Insurance coverage and reimbursement for VNS is typically available for these neurological conditions, but not for the treatment of depression. This is an unfortunate example of the stigmatization of psychiatric illness—when an FDA-approved device can be kept from people in need of treatment.

Revising Traumatic Memories in the Reconsolidation Window

October 6, 2017 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

elderly womanWe have previously described in the BNN how therapies can take advantage of the memory reconsolidation window to reduce the power of traumatic memories. Five minutes to one hour following active emotional recall of a traumatic event, a ‘window’ opens during which therapies can revise or extinguish the traumatic memory. A 2017 article by our Editor-in-Chief Robert M. Post and Robert Kegan in the journal Psychiatric Research describes how the reconsolidation window could theoretically be used to prevent recurring depressive episodes.

The theory is based on the idea that depressive episodes initially stem from stressors, but eventually become ingrained in the brain’s habit memory system. Cognitive behavioral therapy during the memory reconsolidation window might be a good way to disrupt these habit memories.

The memory reconsolidation window has already been used successfully to reduce traumatic memories and even to reduce heroin and cocaine cravings in addiction. The idea in changing traumatic memories, in the words of researcher Göran Högberg in a 2011 article in the journal Psychology Research in Behavior Management, is to “change a reliving intruding memory into a more distant episodic memory.” Post and Kegan suggest that work in depression would have a similar goal, to rework the triggering experience and render the depressive experience “less harsh, severe, [and] self-defeating (guilt-inducing).”
In exploring this new therapeutic approach, Post and Kegan suggest that it might be best to begin with patients whose depressive episodes are triggered by stressors.

The patient would be encouraged to recall the memory of the particular stressor and any emotions related to it. Then they would be prompted to reframe the memory, either by recognizing adaptive aspects of their response, focusing on their youth at the time of the stressor in the case of childhood memories, addressing any guilt the patient may feel, or other techniques used in trauma therapy. Evoking positive feelings during this period via relaxation exercises would be another useful practice.

In addition to targeting stressors that precede depression, the stress of the depressive experience itself could be a target of reframing during the reconsolidation window.
Questions remain, such as whether to target early or more recent memories, and whether this technique would be as useful in reducing manic episodes. Patient characteristics might also affect the success of this type of therapeutic intervention.

Post and Kegan also address how the therapy might be used in different stages of illness, and how it might be combined with other therapies, such as medications or procedures such as repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).

Use of Hormonal Contraceptives May Increase Depression Risk in Young Women

September 5, 2017 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

Women, particularly adolescent women, are at increased risk of developing depression if they use hormonal contraceptives, according to a 2016 study in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. The study by Charlotte Wessel Skovlund and colleagues used data from a Danish registry of more than one million women between the ages of 15 and 34 who had no history of depression or other psychiatric disorders. During follow-up (which lasted an average of 6.4 years), 55% of the women were using or had recently used hormonal contraceptives. These women were more likely to be prescribed an antidepressant for the first time, and more likely to be diagnosed with depression compared to women who did not use hormonal contraceptives.

The increased risk of being prescribed an antidepressant varied by contraceptive type. The norgestrolmin patch increased risk by 2.0 times, and the etonogestrel vaginal ring did so by 1.6 times. The levonorgestrel intrauterine device (IUD) made an antidepressant prescription 1.4 times more likely. Progestin-only pills increased risk by 1.34 times and combined oral contraceptive pills increased it by 1.23 times compared to women who did not use oral contraceptives.

The relative risk peaked at around six months after starting hormonal contraceptives.

Patients aged 15–19 were particularly vulnerable to depression. The likelihood of receiving an antidepressant prescription was 1.8 times higher in teens taking combined pills, 2.2 times higher in those taking progestin-only pills, and 3 times higher in teens using hormonal methods of birth control that are not delivered orally compared to those who did not use hormonal contraceptives at all.

Women with History of Depression 20 Times More Likely To Have Postpartum Depression

September 1, 2017 · Posted in Risk Factors · Comment 

mother and infantA study of almost all women who gave birth in Sweden between 1997 and 2008 reports that women with a history of depression are 21.03 times more likely to suffer from postpartum depression than those without such a history. The 2017 article by Michael E. Silverman and colleagues in the journal Depression and Anxiety reports that advanced age and gestational diabetes also increased the likelihood of postpartum depression.

Whether a woman had gone through a depression in the past also affected her other risk factors for postpartum depression. Among women who had been depressed before, having diabetes before pregnancy and having a “mild” pre-term delivery were risk factors for postpartum depression. In contrast, among women with no history of depression, young age, having an instrument-assisted or caesarean delivery, and “moderate” pre-term delivery were risk factors for postpartum depression.

Rates of postpartum depression decreased one month after delivery.

Editor’s Note: About one in five women in the general population experience postpartum depression. All new mothers should be screened for postpartum depression, but especially those with a history of depression. Instituting supportive measures may help prevent an episode.

Breathing-Focused Yoga and Meditation Improved Depression

August 24, 2017 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

woman meditating

A 2016 article in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry reports that Sudarshan Kriya yoga, a breathing-based meditation intervention, improved depression in people who had had an inadequate response to antidepressants.

In the study by researcher Anup Sharma and colleagues, 25 participants were randomized to either receive the breathing-based meditation training right away or be put on a waitlist to receive the training later. After two months, those who received the intervention showed improvement in depression scores compared to those on the waitlist. The intervention also reduced anxiety.

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Depression, But Supplements Helped

August 14, 2017 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

vitamin DA review article in the Journal of Affective Disorders in 2017 summarized findings linking vitamin D to depression. Researcher Gordon B. Parker and colleagues found an association between low vitamin D levels and depression. They also found that vitamin D supplements improved treatment in people with clinical depression and vitamin D deficiency.

Editor’s Note: Vitamin D supplements are an obvious recommendation for people who are deficient. What has not yet been resolved is whether vitamin D is helpful to people who are depressed but not vitamin D deficient.

In a 2013 study in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Nayereh Khoraminya and colleagues suggested that a 1500 IU dose of vitamin D3 combined with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant fluoxetine was more effective than fluoxetine plus placebo in depressed patients who were not necessarily deficient in vitamin D.

Next Page »