Some Antacids Cause Kidney Damage with No Prior Symptoms

September 11, 2017 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

kidneyCommonly used antacids such as Prevacid, Nexium, Prilosec, and Protonix can impair kidney function, according to a 2017 article in the journal Kidney International. These drugs, known as proton pump inhibitors or PPIs, should not be taken long-term without monitoring of kidney function. Other antacids that work by blocking histamine H2 receptors do not interfere with kidney function but may not work as well as PPIs.

Researcher Yan Xie and colleagues found that more than half of people who developed chronic kidney damage while taking PPIs showed no earlier acute signs of kidney dysfunction, meaning there may not be signs of kidney function loss until the damage is irreversible. Xie and colleagues suggest that patients and doctors should be more vigilant about monitoring the use of these medications, since waiting for outward signs of declining kidney function is not a reliable way of detecting damage.

More than 15 million Americans use prescription PPIs to reduce gastric acid, bringing relief to heartburn, ulcers, and acid reflux. Millions more buy PPIs over the counter without consulting a doctor about their use.

The study analyzed Department of Veterans Affairs data from 125,596 new users of PPIs and 18,436 new users of H2 blockers. Acute, reversible symptoms of kidney damage, such as reduction in the urine being cleared from the body, fatigue, and swelling of the legs and ankles were seen in less than 20% of the PPI users. However, more than half of those who developed chronic kidney damage and end-stage renal disease never showed these warning signals beforehand. In contrast, only 7.67% of those taking H2 blockers had chronic kidney disease without acute symptoms, and 1.27% had end-stage renal disease, when kidneys can no longer clear waste from the body, and dialysis or a kidney transplant is required.

Xie and colleagues suggest carefully monitoring kidney function in people taking PPIs, even when there are no outward signs of problems. They also suggest carefully evaluating whether PPIs are necessary, since the risk of kidney damage is serious.

Use of Hormonal Contraceptives May Increase Depression Risk in Young Women

September 5, 2017 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

Women, particularly adolescent women, are at increased risk of developing depression if they use hormonal contraceptives, according to a 2016 study in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. The study by Charlotte Wessel Skovlund and colleagues used data from a Danish registry of more than one million women between the ages of 15 and 34 who had no history of depression or other psychiatric disorders. During follow-up (which lasted an average of 6.4 years), 55% of the women were using or had recently used hormonal contraceptives. These women were more likely to be prescribed an antidepressant for the first time, and more likely to be diagnosed with depression compared to women who did not use hormonal contraceptives.

The increased risk of being prescribed an antidepressant varied by contraceptive type. The norgestrolmin patch increased risk by 2.0 times, and the etonogestrel vaginal ring did so by 1.6 times. The levonorgestrel intrauterine device (IUD) made an antidepressant prescription 1.4 times more likely. Progestin-only pills increased risk by 1.34 times and combined oral contraceptive pills increased it by 1.23 times compared to women who did not use oral contraceptives.

The relative risk peaked at around six months after starting hormonal contraceptives.

Patients aged 15–19 were particularly vulnerable to depression. The likelihood of receiving an antidepressant prescription was 1.8 times higher in teens taking combined pills, 2.2 times higher in those taking progestin-only pills, and 3 times higher in teens using hormonal methods of birth control that are not delivered orally compared to those who did not use hormonal contraceptives at all.

Birth Defects from Valproate Lower in Bipolar Disorder than in Epilepsy

August 30, 2017 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

pregnancyThe anticonvulsant valproate increases the risk of serious birth defects in fetuses exposed to it. However, a 2017 report by ANSM, France’s agency for health and product safety, and its national insurance fund for employed workers shows that these risks are lower for women taking valproate for bipolar disorder than for women taking valproate for epilepsy.

In France, the risk of a major fetal malformation was 10.2 per 1000 women in the general population, about twice that (22.2 per 1000) in women taking valproate for bipolar disorder, and about 4 times higher (46.5 per 1000) in women taking valproate for epilepsy. The authors suggest that treatment for bipolar disorder may be more likely to be interrupted during pregnancy, and this could explain the different levels of risk by diagnosis.

Among the risks of defects in the fetuses of women being treated with valproate for epilepsy, the risk of a ventricular septal defect (a hole in the wall separating the lower heart chambers) was 11.2% compared to 2.7% in fetuses not exposed to valproate, while risk of an atrial septal defect (a hole in the wall separating the upper heart chambers) was 19.1% in the fetuses of those prescribed valproate for epilepsy compared to 1.9% in unexposed fetuses. Risk of hypospadias (placement of the urethra opening on the underside of the penis rather than its end) was 22.7% compared to 4.8% in the general population.

Risks of a major malformation were dose dependent in those with epilepsy (but interestingly, not in those with bipolar disorder), meaning the more valproate patients with epilepsy took, the higher their risk of a fetus with birth defects.

The only birth defects that were more common in the fetuses of women taking valproate for bipolar disorder than in fetuses not exposed to valproate were hypospadias (17.5% risk compared to 4.8% in the general population) and craniostenosis, a deformity of the skull (4.2% risk compared to 0.4% in the general population).

The relative safety of valproate in women being treated for bipolar disorder compared to those being treated for epilepsy is good news for some. However, fetal exposure to valproate has also been linked to deficits in cognitive development.

The risk of spina bifida, which causes lifetime paralysis, in a fetus may no longer be such a catastrophic  issue for women taking valproate for bipolar disorder (where the risk did not exceed that of the general population), as was once assumed based on data from women with epilepsy (where the risk is usually 2-4%, but was 8% in this French study). This may be of some comfort to women with bipolar disorder who require valproate treatment to remain stable and wish to become pregnant or in those who experience an unplanned pregnancy.

Some Drugs for Hypertension Come with Greater Risk of Mood Disorders

July 26, 2017 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

blood pressureDepression and bipolar disorder have been linked to atherosclerosis, the accumulation of fats, cholesterol, and plaques on the walls of the arteries. There is some evidence that drugs to treat hypertension may contribute to mood disorders. A large study published in the journal Hypertension in 2016 suggests that certain classes of anti-hypertensive drugs, calcium antagonists and beta blockers, may increase risk of mood disorders compared to other treatments for hypertension.

The study by researcher Angela H. Boal and colleagues used data from a hospital database to identify 144,066 patients between the ages of 40 and 80 who had taken anti-hypertensive drugs for more than 90 days. There was an independent linear connection between receiving a prescription for hypertenstion and being diagnosed with a mood disorder. Patients who took angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blocking drugs had the lowest rates of mood disorder admissions. Those taking calcium antagonists or beta blockers had an increased risk of a mood disorder, while those taking thiazide diuretics and those not taking anti-hypertensive drugs had no change in risk.

Preventing Metformin Side Effects

July 24, 2017 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

metformin tablets

Depression is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and the drug metformin is a common treatment for diabetes. In a 2016 article in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, researcher Chittaranjan Andrade suggests ways of minimizing side effects from metformin.

Gastrointestinal side effects such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal discomfort, flatulence, and diarrhea are common on metformin. In the article, Andrade writes, “These are less likely to occur with gradual dose uptitration, administration of the drug with meals, and use of a time-release formulation.”

Lactic acidosis, a buildup of lactate in the body that can result in muscle pain, burning, and other symptoms, is a rare side effect of metformin. Avoiding prescribing metformin to people with impaired kidney, liver, or cardiac functioning and other risk factors can prevent lactic acidosis.

Vitamin B12 absorption can also be affected by long-term metformin use. Andrade suggests that rather than waiting for a vitamin deficiency to be identified, a proactive approach should be taken. Long-term metformin users could be given an annual intramuscular shot of vitamin B12.

Antipsychotic Use During Pregnancy Most Likely Safe

November 4, 2016 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

antipsychotics during pregnancy

A new study suggests that women can continue using antipsychotic medications during the first trimester of pregnancy without meaningfully increasing the risk of birth defects in their offspring.

The study, by Krista F. Huybrechts and colleagues in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, looked at Medicaid users who filled at least one prescription for an antipsychotic medication during their first trimester of pregnancy, when an embryo’s vital organs are formed, and went on to have a live birth. Birth defects, including cardiac malformations, in these children were identified in the first 90 days after delivery and compared to the number of such abnormalities in the children of women on Medicaid who did not receive a prescription for an antipsychotic drug during the first trimester of pregnancy. The number of abnormalities was slightly higher in the children of women who had received atypical antipsychotics than in those who had not, and slightly lower in the children of women who had received a typical antipsychotic than in those who had not.

Huybrechts and colleagues concluded that taking an antipsychotic medication during the first trimester of pregnancy does not meaningfully increase the risk of birth defects in the offspring.

The children of women who took the antipsychotic risperidone did have a small increased risk of birth defects, including cardiac malformations. The researchers called for additional study of risperidone use during pregnancy.

Study Shows FDA Drug Safety Warning on Citalopram Backfired

November 3, 2016 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

veteran

In August 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning that doses of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant citalopram (Celexa) that exceeded 40mg/day could prolong the QT interval, a measure of heart rate used to diagnose abnormal heart rhythms. A study of records from the Veterans Health Administration showed that 35,848 veterans whose dose of citalopram was reduced from an average of 64mg/day to under 40mg/day faced increased deaths, hospitalizations for any cause, and hospitalizations for depression specifically after the reductions.

The FDA warning meant to prevent heart problems had the unintended consequence of increasing hospitalizations and deaths among the veterans affected. These findings by Thomas S. Rector and colleagues were published in the American Journal of Psychiatry in 2016.

Editor’s Note: There are some similarities between this case and findings by researchers Andrew Nierenberg and Andrew Stoll, who noticed that patients taking 40mg/day of fluoxetine (Prozac) had better long-term outcomes than those taking 20mg/day, even though those taking 40mg were more ill and more likely to relapse at the start of the study.

Researchers Ellen Frank and David Kupfer found that 90% of unipolar depressed patients relapsed when their antidepressant doses were halved, even though they had been stable for 5 years before the change.

These and the findings from Rector and colleagues lead this editor to believe that reducing the dosage of effective treatments should not be done without reason—that is, in the absence of side effects, or simply to achieve the minimal effective dose. Dose reductions without cause not only may increase the risk of relapse, but may also put the patient at increased risk of developing tolerance to the medication, for example hastening the onset of ‘Prozac poop-out.’

When long-term maintenance drug therapy is going well, it may be best to be conservative and stay the course. Conversely, in the absence of a good long-term response, be as active and creative as possible to achieve mood stabilization.

Mouse Study Shows That Ketamine Metabolite May Treat Depression with Fewer Side Effects

October 13, 2016 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

In mice, ketamine metabolite treats depression without side effects

The drug ketamine has been used intravenously for years to rapidly treat depression, because it can take effect within hours. Unfortunately, its antidepressant effects fade in 3–5 days, and it has some unpleasant side effects. In larger doses ketamine is used as an anesthetic and sometimes as a club drug, for its ability to induce hallucinations and dissociation. It can be addictive as well.

A 2016 animal study by Todd Gould and colleagues published in the journal Nature identified a byproduct of ketamine that may be able to provide the drug’s benefits without its side effects.

When the body breaks down ketamine, it produces several chemicals that are known as ketamine metabolites. The researchers found that one of these, called hydroxynorketamine, reversed a depression-like state in mice, without producing the side effects that would be expected of ketamine.

Gould and colleagues also determined that blocking the transformation of ketamine into hydroxynorketamine prevented ketamine’s antidepressant effects.

Ketamine’s unpleasant anesthetic and dissociative effects result from the blockade of a particular receptor for the neurotransmitter glutamate (the NMDA glutamate receptor). Researchers originally thought that the NMDA blockade was linked to ketamine’s antidepressant effects, but this appears not to be the case. Instead, hydroxynorketamine seems to activate a different type of glutamate receptor, the AMPA receptor.

Gould and colleagues plan to test hydroxynorketamine in humans soon. Because it has already been present in the human body following ketamine administration, they expect it to be safe.

Multiple Risks of Benzodiazepine Use

May 16, 2016 · Posted in Current Treatments · Comment 

benzodiazepine use comes with risks

Benzodiazepines are a class of drugs that became widely used in the 1970s for their ability to reduce panic, anxiety, and insomnia. Some also functioned as anticonvulsants, reducing seizures. They are considered “downers,” with sedating qualities.

New research shows that benzodiazepine use, particularly long-term use, comes with risks such as increased mortality and mood instability.

At a 2015 scientific meeting, researcher Jari Tiihonen reported that among 21,492 patients with schizophrenia in Sweden, benzodiazepine use was associated with increased mortality, while antidepressant and antipsychotic use decreased mortality.

At the same meeting, researcher Cristina Albott reported that benzodiazepines may interfere with the rapid onset of antidepressant effects usually brought about by intravenous treatment with the drug ketamine.

In 2010, researcher Roy Perlis reported in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry that in STEP-BD, a large study of people with bipolar disorder, benzodiazepine use was associated with an increased risk of recurrence of mood episodes.

Editor’s Note: Benzodiazepines can also exacerbate symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and regular use can lead to a decrease in lifespan. It now seems as though there are many reasons to exercise caution in the use of these drugs.

Clarifying the Effects of a Diabetes Drug that Improves Bipolar Depression

May 6, 2016 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 
bladder and prostate

Bladder and prostate

Research continues on pioglitazone, a drug typically used to treat diabetes but with other positive effects on depression and stroke risk. Some researchers are working on determining whether the drug increases the risk of developing certain cancers, including bladder, prostate, and pancreatic cancers. A recent study by James D. Lewis and colleagues in the journal JAMA found no statistically significant increase in risk of bladder cancer among patients taking the drug, but the researchers said they also couldn’t rule out that the drug may increase this risk, as has been seen in previous studies. The study by Lewis did show an increase in pancreatic and prostate cancers in patients taking pioglitazone, but the researchers did not determine whether this was caused by the drug.

Another recent study by Walter N. Kernan and colleagues in the New England Journal of Medicine reported that pioglitazone reduced the incidence of stroke and heart attack in patients with a history of stroke or blocked blood vessels in the brain but without a diagnosis of diabetes. Patients who received pioglitazone also experienced side effects including weight gain, edema (an increase in fluids in the body’s tissues) and serious bone fractures.

Pioglitazone has had positive effects in bipolar depression and may one day be used as a treatment for bipolar disorder. For now, it may be worthy of consideration for the treatment of diabetes in patients who also have bipolar depression.

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