Meta-Analysis Shows Effectiveness of Ketamine for Bipolar and Unipolar Depression

April 22, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

ketamine infusion

Ketamine, an anesthetic sometimes used intravenously in the treatment of depression, can bring about rapid onset of antidepressant effects. A new meta-analysis by researcher Michael Bloch and colleagues presented at a recent conference showed that ketamine’s maximum antidepressant effects occur within one day of administration, and its effects remain significant (compared to control conditions) one week following infusion. Ketamine’s effects were diminished in patients taking other medications. There was a trend for better response in patients with bipolar disorder than with unipolar disorder.

Bloch and colleagues analyzed eight earlier studies including a total of 180 participants. In each study, ketamine had been compared to a control condition, either an infusion of saline solution or of midazolam, which mimics ketamine’s sensory effects but does not have antidepressant effects. The researchers are calling for more meta-analyses of ketamine studies to determine which patients respond best to ketamine and how to sustain ketamine’s effects.

Editor’s Note: In another poster presented at the same conference, James Murrough reported that patients with slower processing speed responded best to ketamine. Other findings have shown that those with a history of alcohol abuse and a common genetic variant of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the val-66-val allele of proBDNF, are more likely to respond to ketamine.

High Blood Pressure is a Marker of Good Response to Prazosin in PTSD

April 20, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments, Risk Factors · Comment 

blood pressure

Prazosin, an alpha-1 adrenoreceptor antagonist, has been found to be effective at reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), including nightmares. Researchers led by Murray Raskind hypothesized that there may be a link between blood pressure and response to prazosin, since resting blood pressure can be used to measure alpha-1 adrenoreceptor responsiveness. In a study of active duty combat soldiers with PTSD, higher resting blood pressure and smaller drop in blood pressure when going from lying down to standing up predicted a better response to prazosin.

The researchers believe that blood pressure can be used to estimate the central nervous systems’s responsiveness to norepinephrine, which prazosin blocks. In patients with PTSD who received placebo instead of prazosin, blood pressure did not predict improvement. Raskind and colleagues hope to be better able to predict response to prazosin in PTSD by measuring patients’ baseline blood pressure.

Ziprasidone Added to Escitalopram Improved Unipolar Depression

April 17, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

unipolar depression

In a new study of patients with major depressive disorder who did not improve after eight weeks of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant escitalopram, the addition of the atypical antipsychotic ziprasidone improved their depression more than did placebo. Patients took the combination of escitalopram (20mg/day on average) and ziprasidone twice a day at doses of 20–80 mg.

This was the first randomized, double-blind placebo controlled trial of ziprasidone as an adjunct treatment for unipolar depression. While ziprasidone was more efficacious than placebo, discontinuation of the study due to intolerance was higher among the patients who received ziprasidone.

Editor’s Note: Two atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine and aripiprazole) have been approved by the Federal Drug Administration for augmentation of antidepressants in unipolar depression. Now there have also been placebo-controlled positive trials of two others (ziprasidone and cariprazine).

These findings are of particular interest as the studies of ziprasidone monotherapy in bipolar depression not only failed, but response to ziprasidone and placebo was virtually identical (and negligible).

More Evidence for Cariprazine’s Efficacy in Bipolar Depression

April 15, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

bipolar depression

In an eight-week study of the drug cariprazine for bipolar depression by Joe Calabrese and colleagues, patients who received 1.5mg/day doses of the drug showed more improvement in their illness and higher remission rates after six weeks than patients who received placebo. Side effects were rare, with mild or moderate akithisia (restless legs) being most common. Cariprazine is a dopamine D3 and D2 receptor partial agonist with preferential binding to D3 receptors.

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation May Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia

April 13, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

transcranial direct current stimulationA recent study by Robert Smith and colleagues studied the use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with schizophrenia. TDCS is very low level current that has a positive (anode) or negative (cathode) electrode. Anodal stimulation of the cortex is usually associated with positive effects on mood and cognition. Patients received either five sessions of active tDCS for 20 minutes (at 2 milli Amps) or a sham stimulation for the same period. Then, one day after the final session, the patients were measured on a variety of scales for cognition and illness. Patients who received the active tDCS showed more improvements in working memory and attention than patients who received the sham treatment.

There was no difference in the two groups’ schizophrenic symptoms, including hallucinations. Smith and colleagues suggest that the improvements in cognition may result from changes to brain connectivity networks, since abnormalities in these networks have been identified in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Replications of this type of study are needed to clarify the effect of tDCS on cognition in schizophrenia, but given the safety and convenience of the procedure, the findings are promising.

Exercise Improves Fitness, May Help Reduce Cocaine Use

April 10, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

exercise and cocaine

In studies of rodents, running on a wheel reduces cocaine self-administration. A recent study by Richard de la Garza and colleagues investigated whether running or walking on a treadmill can reduce cocaine cravings and use in humans.  In the study of 24 participants who had been using cocaine an average of 19.7 years, participants were randomized to run, walk, or sit for 30 minutes three times per week for four consecutive weeks. After exercising, the participants reported having less craving for cocaine. Fitness measures such as body weight and resting heart rate improved in both walkers and runners. While not statistically significant, by the end of the study there was a trend indicating that exercise improved abstinence from cocaine and decreased daily craving for cocaine.

Editor’s Note: Exercise Increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurogenesis. In rodents, cocaine is associated with decreases in BDNF in the frontal cortex, and injecting BDNF there decreases cocaine seeking. Whether this BDNF effect or the general effects of exercise on mood and conditioning account for these positive cocaine effects remains to be ascertained.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Improve Mood and Limbic Hyperactivity in Youth with Bipolar Depression

March 30, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

omega-3 fatty acids

Children who have a parent with bipolar disorder are at risk for bipolar illness, but it may first present as depression. Treating these children with antidepressants has the risk of bringing on manic episodes. Researchers are looking for treatment options for youth at risk for bipolar disorder.

Robert McNamara and colleagues found that 12 weeks of omega-3 fatty acids (2,100 mg/day) significantly improved response rates in medication-free youth ages 9–20 years compared to placebo (64% versus 36%). Omega-3 fatty acids but not placebo also reduced the activation of limbic structures in the brain (the left parahippocampal gyrus) in response to emotional stimuli.

Editor’s Note: These data add to the literature on the positive effects of 1–2 grams of omega-3 fatty acids in depression. Given the safety of omega-3 fatty acids and the ambiguous effects of antidepressants in bipolar depression, omega-3 fatty acids would appear to a good alternative, especially since the FDA-approved atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine and lurasidone) are not approved for bipolar depression in people under age 18.

Cariprazine More Potent Than Aripiprazole at Dopamine D3 Receptors

March 25, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

white pills

Cariprazine is a new atypical antipsychotic that has positive results in the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania and depression, and as an add-on treatment to antidepressants in unipolar depression. In a recent study by Frank Tarazi and colleagues, cariprazine shared some actions with aripiprazole (trade name Abilify), which is approved by the Federal Drug Administration as an adjunctive treatment for unipolar depression in addition to treating mania in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Both cariprazine and aripiprazole partially block dopamine receptors. They allow a little stimulation of the receptors (activating or agonist effects) while preventing dopamine from binding there. With ongoing treatment, this blocking action prompts an increase in the number of dopamine receptors to compensate for the blocking.

In rats, both drugs led to increases in several types of dopamine receptors, but cariprazine did so at lower doses. Following 28 days of treatment with aripiprazole at doses of 5–15 mg/kg, rats had higher levels of D2 and D4 receptors in several brain regions than other rats that received no drug. Higher doses of aripiprazole also increased D3 receptors in some regions, indicating that the drug works less well at those receptors. Lower doses of cariprazine (0.06–0.6 mg/kg) increased D2 and D4 receptors significantly, and increased D3 receptors more than aripiprazole did, and in a greater number of forebrain regions.

Among antipsychotic drugs, both aripiprazole and cariprazine are unique in providing a little stimulation (partial agonist effects) at dopamine receptors, while all others drugs in the class are pure blockers (antagonists) of dopamine receptors.

The researchers concluded that cariprazine was more potent than aripiprazole at dopamine receptors, especially D3 receptors.

The Combination of N-Acetylcysteine and Varenicline Reduces Nicotine Addiction in Rats

March 17, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

rat with pills

Nicotine addiction is highly cue-dependent, meaning that certain situations or places will make smokers crave a cigarette even if they’re trying to quit. Researchers working with rodents are exploring a combination of treatments that address different behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms to reduce nicotine addiction. In a recent study by Cassandra Gipson-Reichardt and colleagues, N-acetylcysteine reduced cue-induced nicotine seeking, while varenicline reduced nicotine self-administration. Together the drugs worked better to reduce nicotine relapse than either drug on its own.

In the study, rats were trained to self-administer nicotine (with 0.02mg/kg infusions), and cues were used to reinstate nicotine seeking. The rats were treated with 10 and 30 mg/kg injections of NAC and 1 and 3 mg/kg injections of varenicline.

Relapse is associated with rapid synaptic potentiation in the reward area of the brain, the nucleus accumbens. In addition to the positive behavioral changes noted, NAC also inhibited this synaptic potentiation, limiting rapid changes in the size of spines on dendrites and reducing the ratio of AMPA to NMDA (two different compounds that mimic glutamate) in the core of the nucleus accumbens.

Editor’s Note: The combination of NAC and varenicline has not yet been studied in humans, but because both compounds are effective in reducing smoking, it is likely that this animal research on nicotine will be replicated in humans who are addicted to the nicotine in cigarettes.

N-Acetylsysteine Reduces Cutting Behaviors

March 16, 2015 · Posted in Potential Treatments · Comment 

crying teen

Cutting, or non-suicidal self injury, is a serious problem among adolescents, and few treatments are available. Researcher Kathryn Cullen and colleagues have found that N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant nutritional supplement that has been effective in the treatment of depression and many addictions and habit-related behaviors, can reduce cutting.

The study included 25 participants with a history of non-suicidal self injury, aged 13–21, and 12 controls. They participated in brain scans before and after treatment. Compared to the controls, the self-injurers showed greater overall psychopathology, greater activation in a few brain regions (precuneus, posterior cingulate, insula, and temporal lobes), and reduced lower left frontal activation. Patients who received NAC up to 900mg twice daily in weeks 5–8 of the study reduced their cutting and also showed reduced psychopathology. An increase in frontal activation in response to negative emotion was linked to the reduction in cutting.

Editor’s Note: NAC improves mood in depression, many addictions, and many habits including trichotillomania (excessive hair-pulling), nail biting, and cutting. It may do this by increasing glial glutamate transporters in the nucleus accumbens, the brain’s reward center, which lessens the magnitude of the glutamate signal, mediating the compulsion to engage in the habitual behavior.

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